Arthur R. Lehman, L.L.C.

business litigation Archives

What is fraud and how is it proven in court?

New York business people know that not everyone out there is completely honest all the time. Dishonesty on the part of others can be costly for businesses. What options does a business person have in dealing with these costs? Depending on the circumstances, a fraud lawsuit may be a reasonable course of action. It is important to know how fraud might be proved in court.

5 questions you should ask about non compete agreements

In today's job market, employees making frequent job changes, as well as changing companies, has become commonplace. Non compete agreement are typically used to protect employers from having trade secrets exposed when an employee leaves the company. But how enforceable are these agreements? An employer can have a better chance of protecting themselves and their business by creating non compete agreements that are more specific and reasonable.

Preparing small business owners for business litigation

Many compare starting a business to having a new baby. Many responsibilities come with starting a business, and many unexpected events could occur in the first couple of years. Thus, business owners, like new parents, take the time to protect their rights and interests in a new business. Yet, no matter how careful you are or what protective measures you take, the unexpected can still occur. No one expects to be involved in a business litigation situation. However, it is a matter that small business owners can prepare themselves for.

Alternative dispute resolution can save you both time and money

Legal disputes involving your New York business are a threat to your livelihood and the future of your company. While it is critical to resolve these issues quickly and efficiently, it is not always necessary to resort to litigation to reach a beneficial outcome. In some cases, alternative dispute resolution could be a better way to move past certain types of complications.

The pros and cons of arbitration clauses

Many New York business have negotiated contracts in which one party has requested the exclusive use of arbitration to resolve disputes. Should such a clause be included? While some attorneys believe that arbitration is a poor substitute for the courtroom to solve business disputes, the more enlightened view holds that the answer depends on a number of factors.

Uber fires engineer in intellectual property dispute

A common cause of litigation involving intellectual property is the decision by a key employee to take his talent and knowledge to a competitor. Usually, the departing employee and his new employer remain allies in any litigation that ensues. This theme was given a new variation recently when Uber fired one of its star autonomous driving engineers in the midst of complex business litigation with a Google subsidiary involving the alleged theft of intellectual property and unfair competition.

Partner sues NYC doctor misuse of company funds

Doctors may be brilliant when practicing their medical specialties, but they can also be difficult business partners. A lawsuit filed this week in Manhattan Supreme Court accuses a prominent urologist of using funds belonging to a magazine that he and the plaintiff founded in 1996 for personal expenses. The lawsuit provides an example of how business partners, regardless of their professions, can engage in bitter business litigation.

Proactive business owners can minimize risk of lawsuits

When people decide to open their own business, they are taking a major risk because many of the circumstances surrounding the formation of business are out of a potential owner's control. Natural disasters could visit the business and cause a significant amount of property damage. The market could suffer a downturn for reasons that are completely out of the control of the business owners and leadership.

Supreme Court to hear appeal in investor fraud lawsuit

A lengthy and complex lawsuit involving a troubled New York City payroll contract is now headed to the United States Supreme Court. The Court has agreed to review a decision by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit that revived the plaintiff shareholders' securities fraud claims against Leidos, Inc., a large government contractor.